Archive | Asheville

Gaining a Foothold in the RAD

Rendering of Smoky Mountain Adventure Center by Glazer Architecture

Rendering of Smoky Mountain Adventure Center by Glazer Architecture

Twenty-one years after opening Climbmax one of the nation’s first indoor rock climbing gyms in downtown Asheville, Stuart Cowles is on the sharp end again.

In the early 1990’s Cowles left his job as a manager and designer at a climbing gear enterprise in Conway, NH with the goal of opening a climbing gym.

“That was the motivating factor to move to Asheville. I wanted a small city with a solid climbing community that might be able to support it,” he says. Since then, he’s roped in a loyal following and introduced hundreds of folks to the edgy sport.

Fast forward two decades and construction is underway on the Smoky Mountain Adventure Center in the River Arts District (RAD) that will open its doors later this spring or summer. On a small wedge of land on Amboy Road nestled between Carrier Park and the French Broad River Park, the enterprise will feature a state of the art climbing gym, a yoga studio, a beer tap, as well as bike, stand up paddle board and other gear rentals. The outdoor adventure facility was designed by the local architectural firm Glazer Architecture.

Cowles, however, isn’t jumping on the RAD bandwagon. In fact, the entrepreneur took the lead  of the Mountain Sports Festival as the first executive director over a decade ago. While it’s original venue was downtown, “the goal was always to move the festival to the river,” says Cowles.

In 1994, when Climbmax opened on Wall Street, downtown was just on the verge of its renaissance, much like the river district is today. “I decided I wanted to be in the heart of downtown. I looked at opening along the river 22 years ago — at the time it just wasn’t the right place,” he recalls.

Framing of the SMAC commenced on February 11, 2015

Framing of the SMAC commenced on February 11, 2015

But as the rejuvenation of the river district started to turn the bend, Cowles launched a search for another indoor rock gym venue in the RAD. The crux, he says, was finding a workable building for a climbing gym. With assistance from a Buncombe County Tourism Development Authority grant, Cowles decided to take the leap and design and build a new facility in the RAD. While he’ll continue to operate Climbmax, he’s hoping to tie into the growing demand for recreation along the French Broad.

“It’s really a perfect location since the river brings so many active people together,” says Cowles who intends to create a one stop destination for outdoor adventure. “We hope to be an anchor point, engage active people and keep them within the city limits.”

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Dig In, Y’all: Discover the Asheville Small Plate Crawl

Asheville Small Plate Crawl DishesMost would agree that if there were any downside to living in or visiting Foodtopia®, it would be the impossibility of enjoying every fantastic dish and drink it has to offer: The website exploreasheville.com lists nearly 250 eateries. But Laura Huff and Asheville Independent Restaurant Association, the Asheville Small Plate Crawl’s co-presenters, are out to help you taste as many of the city’s culinary creations as possible.

From February 24 through 26, more than 20 participating restaurants will offer low-priced, small-plate menus for the fourth annual event—menus will consist of five to seven items ranging from three to eight dollars. Select restaurants will also be part of a Biltmore Wine Crawl, offering small plates that have been made or paired with the perfect Biltmore wine. Prizes are up for grabs and awarded based on the number of eateries you visit; the Grand Prize will go to a crawler who makes it to 15 or more restaurants. (There are additional prizes for those taking part in the Biltmore Wine Crawl.)

New For 2015

To be eligible to win, you must check in with each restaurant you visit. Doing so will be easier than ever this year, says co-presenter Laura Huff, blogger behind the popular site carolinaepicurean.com: “I’m thrilled to announce a brand new, custom web app. It’s fun, fast, and accurate.”

All you have to do is download a free QR reader to your mobile device and scan when you pay at a restaurant. Each scan checks you in and enters you into the prize drawing automatically. If you’re crawling from place to place with a group, when anyone in your party purchases a plate, everyone gets to scan the code for validation. If you don’t have access to a mobile device, ask for a “Takeaway Card” at every restaurant; the code on each card can be entered later via your computer.

The Crawl’s Catching On

Although folks have been crawling in Asheville since 2012, the event actually began a few years before in Hendersonville. Huff got the idea back in 2008: “It was born of a wish to help restaurants recover from the market crash,” she says. Since then, it has been well received and expanded by request, which Huff notes is both humbling and fantastic at the same time.

Small Plate Crawls are currently being held in six areas in the region, and four more may be added in 2015. To help with growth, Huff has recently partnered with two culinary powerhouses: Nichole Livengood (Gap Creek Gourmet, NicLive PR) for South Carolina events, and Susi Gott Séguret (Seasonal School of Culinary Arts, Asheville Truffle Experience, Asheville Wine Experience) for North Carolina and Tennessee events.

Plan to Go?

If you plan to crawl this month, visit ashevillesmallplatecrawl.com for all the details, including a list of prizes and each restaurant’s special menu and crawl hours. You can also follow the Asheville Small Plate Crawl on Facebook and Twitter for the latest information. Note that reservations are discouraged.

To make the most of your experience, Huff shares these three tips: 1) Bring cash. Credit cards are accepted, but she reminds that paying with cash is much faster and will help you get to more restaurants. 2) Tip generously; servers are working harder for smaller checks. 3) If you’re crawling in a very large group, Huff and her team ask that you try not to occupy seats for too long, especially if only one or two plates are being ordered.

For information about other crawls, visit carolinaepicureanevents.com. Keep your finger on the pulse of WNC’s food scene at carolinaepicurean.com. Photo courtesy of Asheville Small Plate Crawl.

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A Flurry of Wintry Wanderings

 

iceflower

We’ve already had a couple of brutal arctic air masses intrude on our region this winter. When the temperatures drop below 10 degrees and the winds gust over 25 mph, most of us lay low, slow down, snuggle up and enjoy the post-holiday calm. This may be the perfect opportunity to stay indoors and scout out future outdoor adventures. Here’s a sampling of some chilling but not totally frozen seasonal options.

Urban Landscape and Boutique Adventures

Forget the car, hide the keys and search out a car-free outing. On a chilly day, walk or bus into downtown Asheville. Bundle up and take a brisk, self-guided tour of historic Montford isolating its unique architectural features—from corner turrets, to pebbledash exteriors, to hipped dormers. See if you can identify the recent ‘infill’ development, which includes green-built homes and new construction that replicate the Montford style. Stroll along Reed Creek Greenway from Weaver Boulevard to Magnolia Street, then reward yourself with a warming wintertime beverage at High Five Coffee. Jot down a winter/spring gear list while sipping on your coffee or chai.

After the break, hit the pavement again and climb Lexington Avenue into downtown. Crest Patton Avenue to Biltmore and browse seasonal sales at Mast General Store. Continue to shop local by visiting Diamond Brand’s new downtown outpost at the Aloft Asheville Hotel. Plan on a few hours to enjoy this little gem of an urban adventure.

Take a self-guided tour of historic Montford

Take a self-guided tour of historic Montford

Commute to the Commuter Stretch of Parkway

Chilly, sunny day? Grab some friends and head south, young men and women! Base out at Katuah Market in Biltmore Village and pick up some grab-and-go trail lunches. Drive south for a few miles until you reach the ramp for the parkway. Pull off to the right along the gravel parking area (MP 389) to pack your lunch and water, then cross the parkway and start your day with a four-mile out-and-back trek along the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. This convenient and easy hike parallels the parkway most of its course. Some folks opt to spot a second vehicle along the parking area south (before the parkway bridge that spans I-26) to create a shorter 2.5-mile point-to-point option.

Highlights include a pine needle littered tour under towering white pines, frequent deer sightings and a mid-hike picnic along Dingle Creek. After lunch, gently ascend from the bottomland forest and start planning your next section hike while you still have a captive audience.

Pile back in the car, but instead of calling it a day, head to Biltmore Village to sample craft beers at French Broad Brewing Co. and Catawba Brewing Co. Both are conveniently located within a stone’s throw of each other, so you can add a bit more yardage to your day’s hike and not feel too guilty eating one of the delicious pretzels at French Broad.

Weather or Not?

So, it’s a totally freezing day—too bitterly cold to paddle, run, hike or walk. What can you do to get out of the house? When the going gets tough, this lifelong adventurer sometimes goes shopping. Here are a few of my favorite ‘shelters from the storm.’

ScreenDoor: It’s pretty easy to spend an hour or two browsing through the eclectic collage of antiques, yard art, home furnishings and garden treasures. Sometimes I feel like I’m walking through a labyrinth while I navigate through the meandering aisles filled with inspiring creations. Be sure to browse the interesting collection of wholesale books next door, which range in subject from natural history and cooking to home interiors and kid-friendly reads.

 Earth Fare and Frugal Backpacker: This cross-training adventure blends gear and groceries. From downtown, go west and cross over the French Broad River. Bulk up on some dry goods, locally produced kombucha tea, artisan breads and organic veggies at EarthFare, then step next door to the local outfitter. Frugal offers a variety of closeout, discounted and manufacturers’ samples. It’s a great place to stock up on some keep-you-dry goods including socks, bivouacs, boots and other waterproof apparel. So next time the weather forces you indoors, take advantage of the opportunity and take the time to plan your next great adventure.

 

Urban Landscape + Boutique Adventures ~ Take a self-guided tour of historic Montford isolating its unique architectural features—from corner turrets, to pebbledash exteriors, to hipped dormers. Stroll along Reed Creek Greenway then reward yourself with a warming wintertime beverage at High Five Coffee. More tips? 

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ABCs for the New Year

Jonah Igelman walks the line

Jonah Igelman walks the line

I’ve never been the type of guy who’s stuck to my New Year’s resolution (but who has?). So this year I decided to take a novel approach: a list of activities to make the most of the outdoors and my neighborhood without all the driving. While gas prices may be at a two decade low, time is scarce, so here are my ABCs of New Year activities just beyond the front porch.

Arrange gear in my garage
Boulder the dam remains on the Hominy Creek Greenway
Cycle to the store more often
Discover five new running routes
Examine the ecology of a local watershed
Float the French Broad
Garden
Hang in a hammock and read
Identify edible plants
Juggle
Kick a soccer ball
Live outside more
Maintain a derelict piece of public space
Name every tree species on my street
Observe the night sky
Pack a picnic at the local park
Quote Walden in the woods
Run a local 5K
Slackline at the park
Track animal footprints
Unicycle
Volunteer for a park workday
Wage a water balloon fight
X-plore Buttermilk Creek
Yoga in the backyard
Zip down Sulpher Springs Road on a longboard

 

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Going Green with Blueways

 riverlanding

There are many ways to salvation, and one of them is to follow a river.

                                          – David Brower

 Most of us are familiar with the benefits of greenways in our communities. The recent completion of Asheville’s Reed Creek Greenway Phase III is a good example: The 1,300-foot section bridged the existing paved trail to Glenn Creek Greenway, creating a green corridor from Magnolia St to Merrimon Ave. A connected community of parks, trails, recreation, transportation and health makes our region more livable and sustainable. But what about blueways? What are they, and what are their benefits?

Understanding Blueways

To begin exploring the concept of blueways, think “water trails” or “navigable waterways.” Blueways offer compatible and multiple use resources similar to greenways, and, realistically, they already exist. Lakes and rivers have always drawn people to their waters, and, by law, navigable waters are public thoroughfares. However, the lands along their banks and shores may be privately owned. So, blueways—or developed water trails—provide legal access points, signage, maps and other amenities.

Additional community support from user groups, government agencies, landowners, volunteers and outfitters can greatly expand a blueway’s development. Facilities such as boat ramps, camping areas and restrooms extend recreational opportunities along a trail and enhance a users’ experience. In some cases, the connectivity of multiple resources can transform a day outing into a multi-day excursion.

Blue Trail Issues

Blueways garnered a lot of national attention in May 2012 under President Obama’s America’s Great Outdoors Initiative. The Department of Interior unveiled an ambitious, albeit ambiguous, federal initiative establishing national water trails as a class of national recreational trails under the National Trails System Act of 1968.

The Secretarial Order established a network of designated water trails on rivers across the country. Key focus points of the program promoted outdoor recreation and national recognition to existing, local water trails.

Unfortunately, the non-regulatory program was dissolved two years later due to increased opposition from landowners, stakeholders and several politicians. Most of these skeptics cited an increased threat of federal regulation and an infringement on their property rights. However, regional and state blueway development efforts have propagated and have continued to prosper around the country.

 

blueway

Blueways in the Carolinas

The Carolinas’ currently have a number of blueway initiatives underway. The Carolina Thread Trail is a regional network of greenways, trails and blueways that meanders through 15 counties and two states. The “thread” includes 220 miles of trails throughout the foothills and piedmont of North and South Carolina. These multi-use trails are open to the public and accessible to nearly two million people who live, work and play within the region.

Smoky Mountain Host of North Carolina currently showcases a number of western NC’s rivers and lakes in their promotion of Smoky Mountain Blueways. The destination marketing organization serves seven western NC counties and the Qualla Boundary of the Cherokee Indian Reservation. According to their website, “Blueways (also known as blue trails) are the water equivalent to land based trails and greenways.” The organization reports that recreational trails often stimulate the local economy, preserve natural areas, promote healthy lifestyles, improve water and air quality, and connect people to natural places.

Southern Appalachian blueways and paddle trails also connect borders when their rivers and lakes meander through state lines. Close to home, the French Broad Paddle Trail includes a developing recreational water trail with designated campsites and boat ramps that stretches close to 140 miles through western NC and eastern Tennessee. In Tennessee, the paddle trail joins the French Broad Blueway, which includes a 102-mile section that flows to the confluence of the Tennessee River.

Connecting corridors with blueways, greenways, recreation, culture and natural areas links our heritage to our landscape. Some advocates treasure their rivers and lakes as tributaries to the past while others envision a blueprint for the future. Still others living along proposed corridors often oppose public trails and right of ways. Whether they are adjacent landowners, businesses or farmers, some express concern over privacy, government regulations and increased foot traffic.

TELL US: What’s your take?

We hope to open up a discussion and invite others to write about their ‘connections’ to rivers, parks, trails and other outdoor recreation topics. Send us your ideas, comments or news to Sammy Cox, coordinator: ashevillepocketguide@gmail.com.

 

 

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Extended Season: Asheville Farmers Markets Still Bustling

Holiday Asheville Farmers Markets

Good news, farmers market fanatics: Even though the traditional tailgate season has come to an end, a handful of markets are still open for your holiday shopping needs. What’s more, several will operate all winter long thanks to their intrepid vendors and managers!

Asheville Farmers Markets Deck the Halls, Er, Tents

If you’re after that perfect gift, all the fixins for a family meal, or even a Christmas tree, area tailgates have got you covered. They turn into one-stop holiday shops come December. Find artisans selling everything from handcrafted jewelry to candles, and farmers offering fresh-cut trees, meats, cheeses, eggs, honey, fall produce, and more.

If you’re near the French Broad River Corridor, shop West Asheville Tailgate Market, which moved indoors this month to the Mothlight; the market is held Tuesdays from 2:30 until 6 pm and runs through December 23. Asheville City Market is also close by, just on the edge of downtown. This month, it’s in its usual location—the parking lot of the Asheville Public Works building on South Charlotte Street. But manager Mike McCreary is trying something unusual: For the holidays, he invited local hard cider makers Naked Apple Cider and Urban Orchard Cider Company plus local winemaker Addison Farms Vineyard to serve up samples and sell their potables. The market runs Saturdays from 10 am to 12:30 pm.

Where to Buy Local This Winter

After the holidays, Asheville City Market will head inside the public works building for the winter, beginning January 10 (running Saturdays, 10 am-noon). It’ll offer the same local food finds it does the rest of the year: baked goods, jams, meats, cheeses, eggs, and, yes, produce—think hardy crops like apples, potatoes, and greens. In fact, according to Molly Nicholie, program director for the local food nonprofit ASAP (which runs the tailgate), you might find more farm-fresh produce there and at other winter markets than you’d expect.

“There are a lot of farmers who really understand that winter tailgates are great opportunities for them to extend their season,” she says, adding, “There’s a lot more produce at winter markets now than there was a year or two ago.”

Nicholie also reminds that Appalachian Grown partner grocery stores—those committed to sourcing products certified by ASAP as locally grown—have local foods to offer now and throughout the cold months. Look for meat from Hickory Nut Gap Farm and Brasstown Beef at select Ingles. And visit groceries like Katuah Market and French Broad Food Co-op, which, she shares, continue to fill their shelves this time of year with Appalachian Grown veggies like roots and winter squash.

For complete lists of Western North Carolina markets open during the holidays and winter season, including dates and times, visit ASAP’s community website fromhere.org. To find Appalachian Grown partner groceries, browse their online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org. Winter market photo courtesy of ASAP.

 

 

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Fish Oar Float

Jason Brownlee at work in the French Broad Riverworks shop within Carrier Park

Jason Brownlee at work in the French Broad Riverworks shop within Carrier Park (photo courtesy of French Broad Boatworks)

I recently caught up with Jason Brownlee, the co-owner of the French Broad Boatworks and Asheville native to chat about their handcrafted riverboats and upcoming river tours.

He and his partner William Evert, both avid anglers, skilled carpenters, furniture makers and homebuilders, joined forces five years ago to begin crafting high-end boats for fishermen. But not just any fishing boat, their fleet of hand crafted, oar powered river dories are top-of-the-line and a nod to the traditional ocean vessel that’s known for its seaworthiness and simplicity.

For land lubbers whose river craft knowledge may be limited to tubes and canoes, Brownlee explains that a river dory is kin to ocean fishing crafts designed with a wide flat bottom, pointy prow and stern, and high sides to ride safely on top of the current.

While the pair dabbled for several years on a design, their classic look they’ve adopted has been reengineered with an ultra modern light wood frame that is sheathed and protected by high tech material. However, the interior is where their woodworking skills really shine and gives the boats a nostalgic look they’d like to preserve.

But Brownlee isn’t just a dory enthusiast, he’s also a river advocate; the thirty-seven year old has seen the river corridor at its best and worst.

“The river district used to be an absolute wreck,” remembers Brownlee. But when the restaurants and bars started to make headway on the river, he knew the tides had shifted and wanted to get more involved with its revitalization. “We’re trying to be part of the experience,” he adds.

Brownlee, of course, is overjoyed at the rebirth of the river district and use of the river; he’d just like to give people the opportunity to glide downstream in high style.

Naturally, dories are ideal for anglers to cast on two feet, but its buoyancy makes for a smooth ride too and an ideal watercraft for birding, hauling camping gear, or just a gentle sunset cruise. So this spring, the pair is launching the Asheville Wooden Boat Tour to lure non-anglers to the experience of floating in a craft boat. The roughly one and a half hour tour will cast off from their workshop within Carrier Park to the Smoky Park Supper Club.

 “We really want folks to experience a drift boat,” says Brownlee. “It’s the only way to go down the river.”

Visit their website for more information about the Asheville Wooden Boat Tour launching this coming spring. www.frenchbroadboatworks.com

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Drink Up, Thaw Out

Urban Orchard's Hot Cider by Jeff Anderson

The weather outside is already a tad frightful, but that doesn’t mean you should stay stuck indoors by the fire. After all, Asheville’s bars and cafés serve a bevy of beverages that are just as warming and delightful. So get out and explore our beloved French Broad River Corridor knowing that a cup to warm up is never far away.

Drinks in the District

If you’re strolling through studios in the River Arts District (RAD), stop into Clingman Café for piping hot organic, fair trade coffees and other café standards. Tea lover? Visit the tea room at Nourish & Flourish, where they serve an impressive selection of black, green, white, pu-erh, and botanical loose-leaf teas, also organic and fair trade certified.

For spirited sips, pull up a bar seat at The Junction and order one of their spicy cocktails to take the chill off your bones. Several items on the drink menu include fiery, nay hellish, ingredients: Their Apex—a spin on the classic sidecar—stars Fireball Cinnamon Whisky, and their Bally Broad incorporates Hellfire bitters, while their Far East warms with wasabi (see recipe below).

The bar + restaurant also features daily drink specials, focusing, says bar and front-of-house manager Courteney Foster, on local and seasonal ingredients. She looks forward to using forthcoming cranberries and blood oranges, as well as spices like cinnamon and nutmeg—expect fun spiked riffs on hot chocolate and cider, too. Junction bartenders can also create custom cocktails; I’ve requested a Hot Toddy there that took all my winter blues away.

Go East West

Speaking of cider, this time of year things also heat up at Urban Orchard Cider Company, just outside the RAD. The cider bar always has at least six taps of their own housemade hard cider. Three are flagships and regularly available: Dry Ridge, Ginger Champagne, and Sweet English. Co-owner and head cider maker Josie Mileke cites their Ginger Champagne’s nice warming finish on the palete, and shares that their Sweet English makes its way throughout the cold months into a hot mulled cider made with brown sugar, cloves, allspice, cinnamon, and nutmeg (pictured above; photo by Jeff Anderson, courtesy of Urban Orchard Cider).

Their other three taps are a rotating seasonal, experimental selection, one of which available now is sure to warm you up. Their Cidra del Diablo, a special for the cidery’s one-year anniversary, is as hot as it sounds: It’s infused with habaneros, along with a little vanilla for some cooling relief. In addition to cider, Urban Orchard also has a full espresso bar and café, serving chai, hot chocolate, drip coffee, and more.

Of course, warming cups can be found all over town. If it’s coffee you’re after, travel our online Asheville coffee trail, and stay tuned for our print Cafe Culture pocket guide.

The Junction’s Far East Cocktail

Ingredients:
1 1/2 ounces vodka (like Tito’s)
1 ounce yuzu sake
1 ounce orgeat (an almond syrup; buy or find recipes for making online)
1 ounce lemongrass tea
1/2 ounce simple syrup
Wasabi powder

Instructions:
Shake and strain first five ingredients. Serve in a martini glass with a wasabi-coated rim. Recipe courtesy of Courteney Foster.

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Autumn Trip Tips, Part II: Hotlines and Fall Color Reports

photo (5)

The Blue Ridge Parkway may be the most popular and convenient fall leaf-viewing drive, but there are lots of other less-traveled opportunities to see the colors of the season. Explore Asheville offers one of most comprehensive digital guides to the area. The official Asheville Tourism site has a convenient one-stop guide to autumn that includes ongoing coverage from early to late fall. So whether you’re traveling by car, bike, motorcycle or by foot, you can select a variety of tours and hikes throughout Western NC.

 Trust us on this one!

You may have been to Hot Springs, but have you ever been to Trust, NC? Try this mid-fall excursion and head north from Asheville to Weaverville and stop by Well-Bred Bakery for a morning snack and a to-go cup of java. Take US 25/70 to Hot Springs and enjoy the brilliant colors of fall along the Walnut Mountains. The descending trip into the quaint river hamlet offers a dazzling array of fall color along the ridge tops and forest coves. Take a break in town and walk along the river to get an excellent open view of the autumn landscape. Better yet, schedule a half-day rafting trip down section nine of the French Broad and immerse yourself into four miles of fall splendor. Trip note: most outfitters require you to book your trip at least a day ahead. Climb out of Hot Springs along Hwy 209 for approximately 15 winding miles and take a left turn in Trust, NC onto Hwy 63. This last section includes beautiful vistas and historic farmlands of western Buncombe County. The 80-mile fall color tour can be driven comfortably in three hours. Take your time and enjoy the ride!

Follow the yellow blaze: Take a detour off Hwy. 209 south of Hot Springs to Rocky Bluff Recreation Area and the Spring Creek Nature Trail. The 1.6-mile trail offers a convenient leaf-lookers’ day-hike along the cascading mountain stream.

 Next up: Go west, brew enthusiasts!

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Up and Running in the RAD

Inside the Asheville Running Company

The Asheville Running Company in the River Arts District (Photo: Asheville Running Co.)

Randy Ashley is accustomed to being a step ahead of the pack. The accomplished distance runner had a successful competitive running career that spanned over two decades including qualifying for two Olympic marathon trials in ‘96 and ‘00.

Now he’s blazing new trail as general manager of the Asheville Running Company in the blossoming River Arts District (RAD).

“I noticed how busy it was at the Wedge and for art strolls,” says Ashley. “I thought someone ought to open a running shop.”

At first, everyone he talked with got cold feet. After all, the RAD may be known for its food, beer and art, but not for its retail shopping. Eventually owners Judi and Dan Foy, whose son was coached by Ashley at the Asheville School, loved his idea and in early September the store opened its doors in the Pink Dog Creative building located at 346 Depot Street, a former warehouse that’s now home to art galleries, two restaurants, and the Asheville Area Arts Council.

While opening a retail shop in what was formerly the city’s most desolate terrain may be chancy, Ashley is acquainted with the challenges. With a partner he opened a running store in Biltmore Park Town Square in 2002, but may have been a few years too early.

Now, with the booming running scene in Asheville and excitement about the revitalization of the RAD, he’s betting the time is right to get a foothold in the shoe business.

In addition to stocking a wide range of top-of-the-line running shoes, accessories and apparel, he also plans on bringing his passion for the sport, knowledge of the area, and skill as a team and personal running coach to the table.

The store hosts weekly group runs that Ashley says are non-competitive, “citizen-type runs” led by store ambassadors, while the footprint and design of their space allows them to host a variety of events, including a series of fitness programs.

“We want folks to feel welcome here and to take advantage of what we have to offer,” says Ashley. “We’re in this for the long-haul.”

To find out more about their weekly runs and other events, check out their Facebook page or their soon to be launched website at ashevillerunningcompany.com

 

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