Archive | Autumn

Extended Season: Asheville Farmers Markets Still Bustling

Holiday Asheville Farmers Markets

Good news, farmers market fanatics: Even though the traditional tailgate season has come to an end, a handful of markets are still open for your holiday shopping needs. What’s more, several will operate all winter long thanks to their intrepid vendors and managers!

Asheville Farmers Markets Deck the Halls, Er, Tents

If you’re after that perfect gift, all the fixins for a family meal, or even a Christmas tree, area tailgates have got you covered. They turn into one-stop holiday shops come December. Find artisans selling everything from handcrafted jewelry to candles, and farmers offering fresh-cut trees, meats, cheeses, eggs, honey, fall produce, and more.

If you’re near the French Broad River Corridor, shop West Asheville Tailgate Market, which moved indoors this month to the Mothlight; the market is held Tuesdays from 2:30 until 6 pm and runs through December 23. Asheville City Market is also close by, just on the edge of downtown. This month, it’s in its usual location—the parking lot of the Asheville Public Works building on South Charlotte Street. But manager Mike McCreary is trying something unusual: For the holidays, he invited local hard cider makers Naked Apple Cider and Urban Orchard Cider Company plus local winemaker Addison Farms Vineyard to serve up samples and sell their potables. The market runs Saturdays from 10 am to 12:30 pm.

Where to Buy Local This Winter

After the holidays, Asheville City Market will head inside the public works building for the winter, beginning January 10 (running Saturdays, 10 am-noon). It’ll offer the same local food finds it does the rest of the year: baked goods, jams, meats, cheeses, eggs, and, yes, produce—think hardy crops like apples, potatoes, and greens. In fact, according to Molly Nicholie, program director for the local food nonprofit ASAP (which runs the tailgate), you might find more farm-fresh produce there and at other winter markets than you’d expect.

“There are a lot of farmers who really understand that winter tailgates are great opportunities for them to extend their season,” she says, adding, “There’s a lot more produce at winter markets now than there was a year or two ago.”

Nicholie also reminds that Appalachian Grown partner grocery stores—those committed to sourcing products certified by ASAP as locally grown—have local foods to offer now and throughout the cold months. Look for meat from Hickory Nut Gap Farm and Brasstown Beef at select Ingles. And visit groceries like Katuah Market and French Broad Food Co-op, which, she shares, continue to fill their shelves this time of year with Appalachian Grown veggies like roots and winter squash.

For complete lists of Western North Carolina markets open during the holidays and winter season, including dates and times, visit ASAP’s community website fromhere.org. To find Appalachian Grown partner groceries, browse their online Local Food Guide at appalachiangrown.org. Winter market photo courtesy of ASAP.

 

 

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Drink Up, Thaw Out

Urban Orchard's Hot Cider by Jeff Anderson

The weather outside is already a tad frightful, but that doesn’t mean you should stay stuck indoors by the fire. After all, Asheville’s bars and cafés serve a bevy of beverages that are just as warming and delightful. So get out and explore our beloved French Broad River Corridor knowing that a cup to warm up is never far away.

Drinks in the District

If you’re strolling through studios in the River Arts District (RAD), stop into Clingman Café for piping hot organic, fair trade coffees and other café standards. Tea lover? Visit the tea room at Nourish & Flourish, where they serve an impressive selection of black, green, white, pu-erh, and botanical loose-leaf teas, also organic and fair trade certified.

For spirited sips, pull up a bar seat at The Junction and order one of their spicy cocktails to take the chill off your bones. Several items on the drink menu include fiery, nay hellish, ingredients: Their Apex—a spin on the classic sidecar—stars Fireball Cinnamon Whisky, and their Bally Broad incorporates Hellfire bitters, while their Far East warms with wasabi (see recipe below).

The bar + restaurant also features daily drink specials, focusing, says bar and front-of-house manager Courteney Foster, on local and seasonal ingredients. She looks forward to using forthcoming cranberries and blood oranges, as well as spices like cinnamon and nutmeg—expect fun spiked riffs on hot chocolate and cider, too. Junction bartenders can also create custom cocktails; I’ve requested a Hot Toddy there that took all my winter blues away.

Go East West

Speaking of cider, this time of year things also heat up at Urban Orchard Cider Company, just outside the RAD. The cider bar always has at least six taps of their own housemade hard cider. Three are flagships and regularly available: Dry Ridge, Ginger Champagne, and Sweet English. Co-owner and head cider maker Josie Mileke cites their Ginger Champagne’s nice warming finish on the palete, and shares that their Sweet English makes its way throughout the cold months into a hot mulled cider made with brown sugar, cloves, allspice, cinnamon, and nutmeg (pictured above; photo by Jeff Anderson, courtesy of Urban Orchard Cider).

Their other three taps are a rotating seasonal, experimental selection, one of which available now is sure to warm you up. Their Cidra del Diablo, a special for the cidery’s one-year anniversary, is as hot as it sounds: It’s infused with habaneros, along with a little vanilla for some cooling relief. In addition to cider, Urban Orchard also has a full espresso bar and café, serving chai, hot chocolate, drip coffee, and more.

Of course, warming cups can be found all over town. If it’s coffee you’re after, travel our online Asheville coffee trail, and stay tuned for our print Cafe Culture pocket guide.

The Junction’s Far East Cocktail

Ingredients:
1 1/2 ounces vodka (like Tito’s)
1 ounce yuzu sake
1 ounce orgeat (an almond syrup; buy or find recipes for making online)
1 ounce lemongrass tea
1/2 ounce simple syrup
Wasabi powder

Instructions:
Shake and strain first five ingredients. Serve in a martini glass with a wasabi-coated rim. Recipe courtesy of Courteney Foster.

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Autumn Trip Tips, Part III: Go West, Brew Enthusiasts!

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You’re definitely a local if…you’ve visited all of the 18 breweries in Asheville and Buncombe County. But now it’s time to spread your wings and experience the unique charm and treasures of other WNC Breweries. Our Oktoberfest pick includes the three sweet craft beer breweries of Haywood County. Just a short and scenic 30-minute drive west of Asheville, the town of Waynesville offers a great weekend outing full of adventure, shopping, fine restaurants and locally crafted beer! Nestled in the shadow of towering Cold Mountain, the town’s historic district and Main Street begins the brewery tour. If you’re looking for the perfect combination of food and drink, start the day with lunch at The Tipping Point Tavern. The tavern started brewing and serving its own beer in 2012, and it has a great selection of pub fare served by a friendly staff. Our first pick-of-the-day is their Hiking Viking Blonde. I stopped by last month and had an interesting seasonal Blueberry Blonde. Perfect! To ensure you have enough fuel for the day’s tastings, invest in their Grandma’s Oatmeal Cake.

Sammy Cox shares an autumn brew with Frog Level Brewing Co.'s owner/brewer Clark Williams

Sammy Cox shares an autumn brew with Frog Level Brewing Co.’s owner/brewer Clark Williams

Next up, and only a short drive or hop down the hill, is the historic Frog Level area of town. This revitalized railroad district includes a delightful collection of shops, galleries, antique stores, an artisan coffee house and Frog Level Brewing. As soon as you walk in the restored brick warehouse you’ll feel right at home. Inspiring, wide-angle landscape photography and local art greets you as you walk into the friendly space. You’ll feel like a local “level-head” as soon as you order up and start talking with the servers, brewers or patrons.  Check out Lily’s Crème Boy Ale for a “light and refreshing” second beer of the day. Be sure to step out on the shared back porch (Panacea Coffee Co.) and patio overlooking Richland Creek. One of the best brew porches in Western Carolina!

To complete the Waynesville Brewers’ Tour, place your last call at Bearwater’s Brewing . The award-winning brewery offers a variety of small batch brews including several of their 2013 Carolina Championship of Beers. I recently enjoyed one of the silver medal finalists, the Shining Creek Ale, inside their cozy taproom. Be sure to sample some of their barrel-aged beers and their collaboration beers with other local breweries. For more info about WNC Breweries and self-guided tours, visit: A Guide to the Craft Breweries & Pubs of Western North Carolina.

 

 

Brew to view outing: Old Butt Trail/Shining Rock Creek/Shining Creek Trail/Big East Fork. Highlights include streamside trails, high country views and house-size boulders along the Big East Fork. This is a strenuous hike but like the beer with its namesake, a smooth finish to the day! 

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Autumn Trip Tips, Part II: Hotlines and Fall Color Reports

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The Blue Ridge Parkway may be the most popular and convenient fall leaf-viewing drive, but there are lots of other less-traveled opportunities to see the colors of the season. Explore Asheville offers one of most comprehensive digital guides to the area. The official Asheville Tourism site has a convenient one-stop guide to autumn that includes ongoing coverage from early to late fall. So whether you’re traveling by car, bike, motorcycle or by foot, you can select a variety of tours and hikes throughout Western NC.

 Trust us on this one!

You may have been to Hot Springs, but have you ever been to Trust, NC? Try this mid-fall excursion and head north from Asheville to Weaverville and stop by Well-Bred Bakery for a morning snack and a to-go cup of java. Take US 25/70 to Hot Springs and enjoy the brilliant colors of fall along the Walnut Mountains. The descending trip into the quaint river hamlet offers a dazzling array of fall color along the ridge tops and forest coves. Take a break in town and walk along the river to get an excellent open view of the autumn landscape. Better yet, schedule a half-day rafting trip down section nine of the French Broad and immerse yourself into four miles of fall splendor. Trip note: most outfitters require you to book your trip at least a day ahead. Climb out of Hot Springs along Hwy 209 for approximately 15 winding miles and take a left turn in Trust, NC onto Hwy 63. This last section includes beautiful vistas and historic farmlands of western Buncombe County. The 80-mile fall color tour can be driven comfortably in three hours. Take your time and enjoy the ride!

Follow the yellow blaze: Take a detour off Hwy. 209 south of Hot Springs to Rocky Bluff Recreation Area and the Spring Creek Nature Trail. The 1.6-mile trail offers a convenient leaf-lookers’ day-hike along the cascading mountain stream.

 Next up: Go west, brew enthusiasts!

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Autumn Trip Tips Part 1: Parkway Passages

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Sometimes when it comes to trip planning, we can’t see the forest for the trees: Sorting through the endless seasonal options of entertainment, recreation and tours is so daunting we can’t even decide on a destination. Our biggest challenge comes before we take the first step out our front door. Don’t worry, I’ve got you covered. Whether you want to live like a local or act like a tourist, here are helpful hints and tips to get you jump-started on your autumn adventures and outings. Plan wisely, invite some friends and enjoy the season!

More than 12 million visitors travel the Blue Ridge Parkway each year. However, I’m always surprised to find that most of my local pals have never visited the Blue Ridge Destination Center. The multi-agency information center might be one of the best regional travel resources in our area.

The LEED Gold certified building includes a tree-house design that appears to float above its natural mountain landscape. The facility showcases green building and sustainable design, including a living roof, natural ventilation and a variety of passive solar strategies. Inside, the center features exhibits, videos, an information center, seasonal displays and other valuable information to assist travelers along their parkway experience.

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Check out the 22-foot, multi-media I-Wall that allows guests to navigate the parkway and interactively experience places along the parkway. And be sure to stop by and talk with the staff at the Blue Ridge Natural Area Visitor’s Center to learn more about the region’s natural and cultural history. Children and adults will enjoy the 70-seat theater, which is currently featuring the 24-minute film entitled The Blue Ridge Parkway—America’s Favorite Journey.

The Blue Ridge Destination Center at BRP milepost 384 is a “go-to” stop whether you’re touring the entire 469 miles of the parkway or are en route to Craggy Gardens for a late-afternoon picnic.

 

Autumn starts early in the high country along Bass Lake, Milepost 295 - photo by Carson Cox

Autumn starts early in the high country along Bass Lake,   BRP Milepost 294 – photo by Carson Cox

 

 

Next up: fall color hotlines and reports.

Early fall leaf-looker’s ramble: Fresh air options include a stroll around the Federal Energy and Water Management’s award-winning facility, or take a 1.2-mile circuit hike along the Mountains-to-Sea Trail from the Visitors Center parking lot.
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